New to FM, Listen to This!



Shownotes

(0:46) Intro

(4:29) What are you reading?

(8:08) Introducing Charles and Lace Management

(11:54) FM organizations help you network

(14:57) Advice for young FMs

(21:51) Transferable skills

(28:28) Developing team connections

(36:16) Leading older team members

(44:05) Wrap up


Links

Shawn Black

Charles Thomas

Lace Management


Book Recommendations

The ONE Thing: The Surprisingly Simple Truth Behind Extraordinary Results

Greenlights


Quotes

“In facilities, sometimes you are kind of forced to be a multi-tasker, but you know, for the most part, when you’re trying to do three different projects at the same time, your focus really isn’t going to be on what you think it is, and ultimately you’re not going to do your best work.” (5:05)


“A big thing to me is learning to be patient. No relationship is built off of the one time that you met and talked with this person. It takes time. Like you have to cultivate that, you have to do that. I think it’s very beneficial to have a vision for that relationship as well. Whatever you’re doing with this person or organization, it needs to be done with purpose.” (28:31)


“It’s a lot easier to put myself in a type of mindset to work with how somebody else [works] versus expecting them to do that for me.” (29:46)

New to FM, Listen to This!


For many FMs, joining the industry can be pretty intimidating. There is often a steep learning curve that comes with overseeing and managing such a wide variety of matters. If the new FM is young, the challenges can be even greater. Managing a team of people that is older than you for the first time can be nerve-wracking.


Charles Thomas recently penned an article for FacilitiesNet.com about how to succeed as a young FM. He joined Shawn Black on this week’s episode of the FM Evolution Podcast to talk about this subject, being a young leader, and his consulting business, Lace Management.


Be Curious

The most important thing to a young FM’s success is their curiosity. With the steep learning curve, young FMs should want to learn everything they can, which isn’t limited to learning from their superiors. When a technician comes out to fix a problem, it’s beneficial to ask about what they are doing and educate yourself on their process and terminology.


Learning the language of the technician is vital. When you can clearly explain the issue, the vendor will know more about what they need to fix the problem. If the technician doesn’t have clear information, the process can become more and more inefficient.


Using Skills from Other Industries

Many young FMs enter their position after working in another industry. Because of the arduous onboarding process for FMs, it can be remarkably valuable to apply skills they’ve learned in previous jobs.


One particular skill that is useful for FMs is social intelligence. Understanding individuals and how they operate and then catering to them personally can be crucial to success.


Perceiving the differences between individuals allows you to see potential problems that are unique to each person or company. You then can make and execute a plan to ensure that the potential issues never reach the person or customer in question.


Developing Team Connections

Cultivating positive relationships and connections with team members and others you interact with is essential to success as an FM. While it can seem difficult at times, there are a few things you can do for your benefit.


Remember that building solid relationships takes time. Patience is critical because it will not happen overnight. It is also helpful to have a vision for what you want to accomplish. Giving purpose to something always helps with accomplishment.


A big thing to me is learning to be patient. No relationship is built off of the one time that you met and talked with this person. It takes time. Like you have to cultivate that, you have to do that. I think it’s very beneficial to have a vision for that relationship as well. Whatever you’re doing with this person or organization, it needs to be done with purpose.” (28:31)


Lastly, remember to be flexible. Building good working relationships requires sacrifice and compromise to accomplish a goal. By preparing yourself for these things ahead of time, you are less likely to be caught off guard and more likely to succeed!


It’s a lot easier to put myself in a type of mindset to work with how somebody else [works] versus expecting them to do that for me.” (29:46)



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