Negative Boss Vs. Positive Leader



Shownotes

(0:55) Intro

(3:34) What are you reading?

(6:13) Positive leaders are forward thinkers

(12:49) What to do when you get stuck

(17:44) Positive leaders are encouragers

(20:59) Practicing what you preach

(27:26) Wrap up


Links

Shawn Black

Jim Robinson

Jim's Article


Book Recommendations

https://www.amazon.com/Post-Corona-Opportunity-Scott-Galloway/dp/0593332210


Quotes

“As a leader, one of the keys to cultivating a work environment that is productive, creative, and high morale is being a positive leader rather than a negative boss, right? This idea might seem simple, but what exactly separates these two identities?” (5:53)


“One of my coaches from years ago recommended that I use a default calendar setting, and I do this religiously now. I program my calendar so when all hell is breaking loose, when you don’t know which way to go, just go look at your calendar and do whatever that calendar has programmed. It’ll inspire you.” (15:49)


Negative Boss Vs. Positive Leader


In his recent article, Jim Robinson wrote, “As a leader, one of the keys to cultivating a work environment that is productive, creative, and high-morale is being a positive leader rather than a negative boss. This idea might seem simple, but what exactly separates these two identities?”


Shawn invited Jim to join this week’s episode of FM Evolution to talk more about Jim’s article and break down the differences between positive leaders and negative bosses. Here’s what you need to know!


Be a Forward Thinkers

When you sit back and observe positive leaders, one commonality that stands out is their forward-thinking approach. Influential leaders avoid getting bogged down in the day-to-day challenges that come across their desks. Instead, they maintain focus on their end goal, allowing it to inspire the creativity necessary to solve the issue at hand.


On the other hand, a negative boss will stop and focus on little complications and roadblocks. They lose sight of their goal, and they spend too much time fixating on small hurdles that stand in their way.


So, you’re supposed to stay focused on the end goal, but how do you avoid getting stymied by problems that arise? One powerful tool that Jim recommends is establishing a default calendar. When you get caught up in a day-to-day problem, look at your default calendar to reorient yourself and continue moving forward.


One of my coaches from years ago recommended that I use a default calendar setting, and I do this religiously now. I program my calendar so when all hell is breaking loose, when you don’t know which way to go, just go look at your calendar and do whatever that calendar has programmed. It’ll inspire you.” (15:49)


For more information on setting up your default calendar, check out another one of Jim’s articles, Using Routine to Encourage Creativity.


Push Your Team

A second common trait amongst inspiring leaders is their ability to encourage their team and push them towards growth. When an employee finishes a project early or goes above and beyond, a positive leader will acknowledge their success and praise them.


Quality leaders will know their team members well, and they will be familiar with each member’s preferences for receiving a commendation. Typically, introverted people will prefer quiet, personal praise that avoids putting them in the spotlight in front of fellow employees. With extroverts, you can place them in the limelight and make quite a fuss about their accolades, ensuring that all of their colleagues are aware of their team member’s success.


Encouraging your team isn’t always about praising them. Encouraging also implies that you drive them towards situations that grow them. Look for projects outside of a team member’s comfort zone, and assign them to it. Be there to guide them when they need help, but allow them to grow into handling the project themselves.


Practice What You Preach

Positive leaders have teams that want to follow in the direction of their leader. When you practice what you preach and lead your team by your example, you not only show your team how to do what you are asking of them, but you also inspire them to be the best version of themselves.


Negative bosses ask their team to do things that the boss isn’t willing to do themself. Being hypocritical in this way is the easiest way to lose the respect of your team. No one wants to follow a leader that doesn’t apply the principles they teach.


Are you looking for more information on becoming a positive leader that inspires others? Be on the lookout for Jim’s book this May!


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