Creating a FM Leadership Culture



Shownotes

(0:58) Intro

(4:33) Guest introductions

(8:35) Being a leader from a supporting role

(13:02) The differing influence of good and bad leaders

(16:33) What are you reading?

(20:07) Showing leadership potential

(24:56) Why FMs have to be leaders

(28:22) Situational leadership

(32:04) FM culture at Penn State

(39:07) Conflict resolution

(41:48) Quick advice for future leaders


Links

Shawn Black

Randy Olson

Mark Bodenschatz

ProFM


Book Recommendations

True North

The Hate U Give

American Character

Get the Life You Want


Quotes

“We can be, as an FM organization, really state-of-the-art in the way that we operate and lead even though we’re supporting and maybe not in main functions of sales and things like that. We certainly can grow to become significant leaders.” (9:01)


“I think it’s our responsibility as leaders to develop leadership in all the individuals that we have the responsibility to help.” (21:48)


“I very much believe in Hersey and Blanchard’s vision of situational leadership - that you need to look at the follower in order to determine how best to lead that follower. And that it changes, and it’ll change through their career, how they’re led.” (27:12)


Creating a FM Leadership Culture

This week’s episode of the FM Evolution podcast is the most recent installation of our ProFM series, where we strive to assist FMs in their journey to excellence. Randy Olson of ProFM and Mark Bodenschatz, the Director at Penn State Facilities Engineering Institute, joined Shawn Black to discuss leadership and its role in FM work environments.


Leaders have an inevitable impact on their employees, and their actions decide whether the impression will be positive or negative. When asked for examples of positive leadership in their lives, Mark and Randy reminisced on leaders that listened to their employees and backed them up in difficult situations.


While FMs don’t necessarily occupy traditional leadership positions, they are often leaders from their supporting roles.


We can be, as an FM organization, really state-of-the-art in the way that we operate and lead even though we’re supporting and maybe not in main functions of sales and things like that. We certainly can grow to become significant leaders.” (9:01)


Are you interested in growing into a leadership role? Check out this advice from Randy, Mark, and Shawn!


Showing Leadership Potential

If you’re looking to grow into a leadership role, it’s critical that you show potential to your higher-ups. One classic trait found in potential leaders is their desire to seek and follow mentors. Young leaders are always ready to learn from someone farther along in their journey. Luckily, good leaders prioritize developing the next generation to take their place.


I think it’s our responsibility as leaders to develop leadership in all the individuals that we have the responsibility to help.” (21:48)


People with leadership potential also take initiative and look for opportunities to grow and help their team. They welcome situations outside of their comfort zone and see them as opportunities to learn something new.


Young leaders are also advocates for positive confrontation. If they see a project or situation moving in the wrong direction, a good leader will confront the problem and address it positively to get it back on track.


Similarly, they take responsibility for their mistakes. Whether they notice it on their own or are confronted with their misstep, a good leader will take ownership of it and make the necessary changes.


Situational Leadership

As young leaders grow and develop, they often have a preferred leadership style, but a good leader will understand the importance of situational leadership. They adapt their style of management practices to fit individual team members.


I very much believe in Hersey and Blanchard’s vision of situational leadership - that you need to look at the follower in order to determine how best to lead that follower. And that it changes, and it’ll change through their career, how they’re led.” (27:12)


Some team members benefit most from hands-off leadership that offers them space to grow while handling their tasks. Other employees require more guidance and hand-holding as you help them reach their full potential. To effectively employ situational leadership tactics, leaders are required to know each member of their team well. This can often be attained through positive culture.


Building a Culture

The leaders of an organization will establish the culture. If a manager is constantly disorganized and stressed, the rest of the team will function similarly. In the same way, if a leader is efficient and timely, their team will follow suit.


The basis of a quality team culture is rooted in trusting one another. Trust is a complicated thing to build, and it is effortless to destroy. You can build trust by investing in your employees and supporting them when they are in difficult situations.


Leaders also build trust through their willingness to listen to criticism and honest opinions. When negative leaders push back against their team’s feedback, positive leaders genuinely listen and adapt to improve.


Are you interested in furthering your journey as an FM and leader? Check out ProFM’s credential course.


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